Cocklebiddy Fire PyroCb in Australia

A slightly longer animation — covering the period from 20:40 on 6 December to 09:40 UTC on 7 December — of Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 μm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 μm) and Infrared Window (10.4 μm) images is shown below. The pyroCb cloud formed near the center of the images, and the cold anvil of the cloud then moved rapidly southeast. The pyroCb reached brightness temperatures of -60ºC (red color enhancement) around 4:50 UTC.

Himawari-8 Visible (top), Shortwave Infrared (middle) and Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Visible (top), Shortwave Infrared (middle) and Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play animation]

Starting at 0:00 UTC on 07 December, the animation below (also available as an MP4) shows Himawari-8 0.63 µm visible (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR (right) . The pyroCb cloud (~32.1º S, 126.1ºE) formed around 2:30 UTC. In the shortwave IR images, the red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source regions.

Himawari-8 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)

In addition, the Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel allowed the cloud-top IR brightness temperature to be measured. The animation below, also starting at 1:00 UTC on 07 December, this animation did not capture the lowest brightness temperatures. However, this animation shows the progression of brightness temperatures near the pyroCb source.

Himawari-8 10.4 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 10.4 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

The image below (courtesy of Colin Seftor) shows on the left the pyroCb from VIIRS and on the right the OMPS AI Index. The maximum AI values are only about 3 which is rather low.

Left VIIRS image and right OMPS AI Index

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