Another PyroCb in Idaho

On 27 August another pyroCb formed from the fire at 45.4 N 116.1 W. The previous day this fire produced a pyroCb. GOES-15 detected the smoke plume and pyroCb cloud, as well as the fire hot spot. Starting at 20:30 UTC on 27 August, the animation below shows visible (.63 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)
GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)

In addition, using GOES-15 10.7 μm IR channel the cloud-top IR brightness temperature could be found. The animation below, starting at 20:30 UTC on 27 August, shows the brightness temperature for the pyroCb is -55.5ºC around 00:30 UTC on 28 August (yellow color enhancement).

GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)
GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

OMPS AI index images (courtesy of Colin Seftor) shows the transport of smoke. The max AI index was 10.1 at 47.88 N 106.12 W. This is value is just northwest of the source of the pyroCb. This image shows that the smoke is moving northeast which is consistent with the animations above.

OMPS Aerosol Index image on 27 August (click to enlarge)
OMPS Aerosol Index image on 27 August (click to enlarge)

Two PyroCbs in Idaho

On 26 August two pyroCbs formed in Idaho. The first pyroCb was located at 45.5 N 115.2 W, and the second pyroCb at 45.4 N 116.1 W.  GOES-15 detected the smoke plumes and pyroCb clouds, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 22:00 UTC on 26 August, the animation below shows visible (.63 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)
GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel (left) and 3.9 µm shortwave IR channel images (right) (click to play animation)

In addition, using GOES-15 10.7 μm IR channel the cloud-top IR brightness temperature could be found. The animation below, starting at 22:00 UTC on 26 August, shows the brightness temperature for the first pyroCb is -48.3ºC around 01:45 UTC on 27 August (lime green color enhancement). For the second pyroCb the coldest cloud top brightness temperature was -50.2ºC around 03:00 UTC on 27 August (lime green color enhancement).

GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)
GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

 

PyroCb in Russia

On 26 August a pyroCb formed around 59 N 127 E. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 05:30 UTC on August 26, the animation below shows visible (.64 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel imagery the minimum cloud-top IR brightness temperatures could be found. The animation below, starting at 05:30 UTC on 25 August, shows that the pyroCb reached around -45.6 ºC (lime green color enhancement) at 08:30 UTC.

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)

Another PyroCb in Russia near Lake Baikal

On 25 August there was another pyroCb east of Lake Baikal in Russia. The first at 52.6 N 109.5 E and the second at 53.4 N 109.8 E. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 02:00 UTC on August 25, the animation below shows visible (.64 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel imagery the minimum cloud-top IR brightness temperatures could be found. The animation below, starting at 02:00 UTC on 25 August, shows that the pyroCb reached around -52.8 ºC (yellow color enhancement) at 04:30 UTC.

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)

OMPS AI index images (courtesy of Colin Seftor) shows the transport of smoke. There are high AI Index values northeast of the lake, which is consistent of the smoke trajectory in the animations above.

OMPS Aerosol Index image on 26 August (click to enlarge)
OMPS Aerosol Index image on 26 August (click to enlarge)

Multiple PyroCbs in Russia

On 24 August there were two pyroCbs near Lake Baikal in Russia. The first pyroCb formed at 52.6 N 109.5 E around 7:00 UTC, and the second pyroCb formed at 53.2 N 109.7 E around 9:00 UTC. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 06:00 UTC on August 24, the animation below shows visible (.64 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

The third pyroCb formed around 52.8 N 108.5 E. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 08:00 UTC on August 24, the animation below shows visible (.64 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel imagery the minimum cloud-top IR brightness temperatures could be found. The animation below, starting at 06:00 UTC on 24 August, shows that the first pyroCb reached around -52.8 ºC (yellow color enhancement) at 07:30 UTC, the second pyroCb reaching -48ºC (lime green color enhancement) at 11:00 UTC, and the third pyroCb reach -48ºC (lime green color enhancement) at 11:00 UTC.

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)

The fourth and fifth pyroCb happened later in the day so visible imagery wasn’t available. The fourth pyroCb formed at 53.4 N 109.8 E and the fifth forming at 54.2 N 109.6 E. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 11:00 UTC on August 24, the animation below shows shortwave IR (3.9 μm, click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

Also, Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel imagery the minimum cloud-top IR brightness temperatures could be found. The animation below, starting at 11:00 UTC on 24 August, shows that the fourth pyroCb reached around -52.1 ºC (yellow color enhancement) at 13:00 UTC, and the fifth pyroCb reaching -48.7ºC (lime green color enhancement) at 14:30 UTC.

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)

PyroCb in Russia

On 23 August there was a pyroCb in Russia. This pyroCb formed around 51 N 95 E at 09:00 UTC. Himawari-8 detected the smoke plume and clouds around the fires, as well as the fire hot spots. Starting at 09:00 UTC on August 23, the animation below shows visible (.64 μm) on the left and shortwave IR (3.9 μm) on the right (click image to play animation). In the shortwave IR images the darker black to red pixels indicate very hot IR brightness temperatures exhibited by the fire source region.

Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 0.64 μm visible (left) and 3.9 μm shortwave IR (right) images (click to play animation)

In addition, using Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR channel imagery the minimum cloud-top IR brightness temperatures could be found. The animation below, starting at 09:00 UTC on 23 August, shows that the pyroCb reached -57.3 ºC (orange color enhancement) at 09:39 UTC.

Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)
Himawari-8 10.4 μm IR images (click to play animation)